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Digest5 Things to Know About Okra, Max Levy’s New Restaurant

5 Things to Know About Okra, Max Levy’s New Restaurant

5 Things to Know About Okra, Max Levy’s New Restaurant
By Charmaine Mok
February 02, 2016
The New Orleans-born chef gives us a taste of his new Hong Kong project

Max Levy Okra Hong Kong chef.jpg

The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed a little restaurant by the name of Okra making the social media rounds recently, helmed by a creative young chef called Max Levy.

Born in New Orleans, Levy has made his way to Hong Kong by way of Beijing, where he runs modern Japanese restaurant Okra 1949 in the Hidden City, as well as Traitor Zhou’s (described as a non-kosher delicatessen serving bagels, doughnuts, wines and coffee); he was also the founder of Apothecary Cocktails and Dining in Beijing’s Chaoyang district.

Having found a spot in Sai Ying Pun, Levy has been developing the menu for Okra Hong Kong for the last few months, inviting friends and family to enjoy the spoils, among them chef May Chow of Little Bao, who wrote: “I won't say too much but go experience the passion, the knowledge, the execution, the well-sourced products and more. It's not often that a chef is able to choose their own interior, beverage program, branding, custom ceramic, art pieces, music and with such knowledge and good taste. Everything has a story.”

Okra Hong Kong.jpg

Images from @okraworks

From both Levy’s and Okra’s Instagram feeds, dishes such as beef pastrami with ume broth and French savoy cabbage, and Bafun uni with smoked anchovies and tofu skin are just some of the genre-blending creations we’re salivating over.

The Sai Ying Pun restaurant will be launching officially later this month after which it will be no-reservations. We’ll be bringing you our report on the restaurant soon but, in the meantime, check out what Levy has to say about Okra Hong Kong in five short snippets:

Max Levy Okra Hong Kong chef 2.jpg

Okra does not serve traditionally raised wagyu. The practices involved in it are bad for the cows and bad for us.

Sake is made for drinking with food, not worshipped.

The food and culture of a restaurant should speak of its location, not what it can import.

Our building was built in 1852 by the Sam Shui Natives Association and is still owned by them today.

I won't change the music. 

Okra Hong Kong, 110 Queen’s Road West, Sai Ying Pun

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Digestnew restaurantMax LevyModern JapaneseSai Ying Pun

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