The Best Quips from Taste of Hong Kong's #TatlerTable

Digest

March 17, 2016 | BY Charmaine Mok

For the second ever food-themed round table, we invited 12 top chefs and industry professionals for a session of candid culinary chinwagging

Tatler Table full.jpg

Photographed by King Fung (Hong Kong Tatler)

After we hosted the first ever #TatlerTable in the autumn of 2015, we couldn’t wait to bring it back – and what better time than at the inaugural Taste of Hong Kong festival, when some of the city’s best culinary minds would be covening, rather conveniently, in one place?

Videography by Tyrone Wu (Hong Kong Tatler)

On the menu for discussion were a few big topics for one hour – including but not limited to Asia as the new culinary centre of the world; the rise of international chef collaborations; thinking beyond wine and looking at the stratospheric rise of cocktail and sake pairings; and the shift in cooking techniques from the scientific to the ‘primitive’.

Scroll down to see highlights from the round table


Our #TatlerTable guests

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Photographed by King Fung (Hong Kong Tatler)

Pascal Aussignac, Club Gascon (London); Agustin Balbi, The OceanVictoria Chow, The Woods; Dan Doherty, Duck & Waffle (London); Richard Ekkebus, AmberElliot Faber, YardbirdNate Green, Rhoda; Erik Idos, ChinoShane Osborn, ArcaneMina Park, SookDave Pynt, Burnt Ends (Singapore) 


What they said

Elliot Faber Dan Doherty Victoria Chow Tatler Table.jpg

Photographed by King Fung (Hong Kong Tatler)

Chefs should be educators as much as TV personalities. Every day people come into your restaurant or your bar, and we have a responsibility to tell them about new things. We have a responsibility to inspire guests on what and how we are serving them.” – Victoria Chow

“Working many years in Japan, you learn a lot about respect for the product. It’s about doing what you believe. But I don’t think I’m a teacher. I’m just a guy who cooks food.” – Agustin Balbi

Everyday is about teaching people something new – whether it’s about teaching people how not to split a taco with chopsticks or telling them about different types of salsa.” – Erik Idos

You need multiculturalism in your kitchen, it helps with exchanging ideas and knowledge.” – Nate Green


What they said

Shane Osborn Dave Pynt Tatler Table.jpg

Photographed by King Fung (Hong Kong Tatler)

Hong Kong feels like it has that edgy buzz, that constant need to strive and do better than before and better than your neighbour. There’s always a sense of urgency.” – Dave Pynt

The whole industry has changed so much for the better since I started in the 80s. There wasn’t this kind of communication – you wouldn’t be sitting around a table with other chefs.” – Shane Osborn

Hong Kong is a great stage for interpreting ingredients and techniques of cultures in our own ways.” – Elliot Faber

There is a certain Noma-isation of young chefs. They all want to do what Rene [Redezpi] is doing. It makes it really difficult to see the real identity of the chef.” – Shane Osborn


What they said

Agustin Balbi Richard Ekkebus Shane Osborn Tatler Table.jpg

Photographed by King Fung (Hong Kong Tatler)

“Your menu is your story. Ultimately you don’t have to explain to people why you want them to eat it.” – Richard Ekkebus

There’s no discussion about local farmers. That is only really starting to gain traction in HK. I know people have made efforts and that’s fantastic because we need to have a sense of place here.” – Mina Park

I’d really like to see more appreciation for the art of the drink outside of the spectrum of wines. I think people need to see the labour that goes into the making. I’d love for bartenders to get more respect.” – Victoria Chow

I’m a huge advocate for pairing Italian food with Japanese sake – not just because I love it, but I believe there is something synonymous between the two food cultures, whether it’s about the umami of the ingredients or the simplicity of the ingredients.” – Elliot Faber


 With thanks to Taste of Hong Kong

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