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Digest The Feed: Mountainside Dim Sum, Meat-Free Koftas And The New Amber

The Feed: Mountainside Dim Sum, Meat-Free Koftas And The New Amber

The Feed: Mountainside Dim Sum, Meat-Free Koftas And The New Amber
By Hong Kong Tatler
June 21, 2019
The latest meal highlights from our resident eaters at T.Dining

Welcome to The Feed—a bi-weekly bite-sized round-up of delicious highlights and food musings brought to you by the team behind T.Dining, designed to help you shape your eating agenda for the weekend ahead. Get more updates and dining inspiration by following us on Facebook and Instagram

A Zero Waste Lunch At Taikoo Place

Say no to single-use plastic with Revolv's reusable lunchboxes (Photo: Charmaine Mok)
Say no to single-use plastic with Revolv's reusable lunchboxes (Photo: Charmaine Mok)

Next month is officially plastic-free July, but you don't have to wait to kickstart a good habit. I'm an advocate for using reusable lunchboxes to help reduce the amount of single-use plastics that are thrown away from takeaways and delivery meals, and was happy to hear that local caterer Invisible Kitchen has partnered with Impossible Foods, Revolv and Swire to present delicious meat-free lunchboxes at Taikoo Place every weekday lunchtime. Customers pay just a HK$40 deposit to get their lunch served in a Revolv reusable lunchbox (made from bamboo), which they can return and swap for another the next time they visit. The weekly changing menu of Impossible Buddha Bowls feature a mix of barley, rice and quinoa topped with a diverse array of toppings: on my visit I opted for the summery Greek Impossible beef koftas with feta cheese, kalamata olives, cucumbers, cherry tomatoes, baby spinach and red onion. Other options include a Mexican-style Impossible chilli with beans, organic tomato and corn, and an Italian Impossible beef with burrata, basil pesto and organic fermented tomatoes from Hong Kong. —Charmaine Mok, Editorial Director of Food & Wine

See also: Impossible Foods’ David Lee And Nick Halla On The Future Of Plant-Based Food

Early Bird Dim Sum On Tai Mo Shan

Early birds arriving shortly after 6:00 am can enjoy an array of traditional dim sum, accompanied by birdsong and morning breeze. (Photo: Charmaine Mok)
Early birds arriving shortly after 6:00 am can enjoy an array of traditional dim sum, accompanied by birdsong and morning breeze. (Photo: Charmaine Mok)

When multi-James Beard Media Award-winning journalist Francis Lam visited from the US and could not decide whether to spend his last Hong Kong morning hiking or enjoying early dim sum, Tai Mo Shan’s Duen Kee Chinese Restaurant was our suggestion to kill two birds with one stone. We arrived shortly after 7:00 am to find ourselves surrounded by visitors and hikers, gathering at the old restaurant while making their own teas and collecting basketfuls of steamed dim sum made just minutes ago. Overlooking the serene landscapes accompanied by birdsongs and casual chatter among visitors, Duen Kee lifted our spirits enough to kick off a hike up the city’s tallest mountain. —Wilson Fok, Dining Editor

Duen Kee Tea House, Chuen Lung Village, Tai Mo Shan, Tsuen Wan, +852 2490 5246

The New Amber

A course of cabbage and shiitake mushroom was served in the Amber kitchen (Photo: Charmaine Mok)
A course of cabbage and shiitake mushroom was served in the Amber kitchen (Photo: Charmaine Mok)

It would seem that the new direction of Amber was perfectly timed to coincide with the unrelenting heat of summer—Richard Ekkebus' lighter take on French gastonomy, eschewing the use of dairy and nearly all gluten, is just the kind of food you might prefer when the mercury stays north of 30C. On my last visit, one of the highlights had to be the daringly simple dish of cabbage with shiitake broth—a dish that proves how a common vegetable can take centre stage in one of the finest restaurants in the world. —CM

See also: How Richard Ekkebus Rewrote The Rules Of Fine Dining For The Relaunch Of Amber

Amber

Restaurant, $$$$, French, Central

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Go Fish At The Chairman

The salt-cured chillies numbed down its heat but were great accompaniment to the gelatinous, almost creamy bits of fish on this rare dish. (Photo: Wilson Fok)
The salt-cured chillies numbed down its heat but were great accompaniment to the gelatinous, almost creamy bits of fish on this rare dish. (Photo: Wilson Fok)

We are convinced, despite The Chairman's impressive signature steamed flower crab with chicken fat and Shaoxing wine, there is more to this Top 20 Best Restaurant awardee. We began our recent visit with gold coin chicken and pickled young ginger, followed by this steamed giant grouper head with pickled chillies, a true representation of nose-to-tail eating in Chinese food culture, wasting close to nothing with the fish head. After just three days of curing the heat of the chillies were enhanced with garlic to make a vibrant spread across the top of the fish head with silvers of pork fat. The gelatinous bony bits of the fish head yield a creamy texture, while its freshness was enhanced by the sharpness of the chillies. —WF

The Chairman

Restaurant, $$$, Chinese, Cantonese, Central

British Fare At Gough's On Gough

Cary Doherty's Beef Wellington is one of the best in town: A tight roll of pastry encasing medium rare beef, wonderful with buttery mash on the side. (Photo: Wilson Fok)
Cary Doherty's Beef Wellington is one of the best in town: A tight roll of pastry encasing medium rare beef, wonderful with buttery mash on the side. (Photo: Wilson Fok)

Since his appointment as executive chef of Gough’s On Gough, Cary Doherty turned the menu of Timothy Oulton’s restaurant back to its British roots. Restoring the glory of British fare, Cary's signatures include a textbook perfect beef Wellington, where a tightly-rolled pastry was baked until golden. A neat cut inside revealed beef cooked just right, a medium rare with duxelles of mushrooms evenly spread between the protein and the pastry. A beautiful specimen and a classic that is even better with buttery mash and gravy. —WF

Gough's on Gough

Restaurant, $$$, British, Sheung Wan

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