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Arts10 Works To See At Fine Art Asia and Ink Asia

10 Works To See At Fine Art Asia and Ink Asia

10 Works To See At Fine Art Asia and Ink Asia
By Oliver Giles
By Oliver Giles
September 26, 2018

For the first time, two of Hong Kong's unmissable art fairs—Fine Art Asia and Ink Asia—are taking place concurrently in the Convention and Exhibition Centre this year.

Before the fairs open their doors to collectors and critics on September 28 (and then the public on September 29), we introduce 10 works you shouldn't miss

1/10California Kiss by Elliott Erwitt

Elliot Erwitt, California Kiss (1956). (Courtesy f22 foto space)
Elliot Erwitt, California Kiss (1956). (Courtesy f22 foto space)

A platinum print of this famous photograph is being brought to Fine Art Asia by Hong Kong's own f22 foto space. Whichever collector takes this print home will be in good company—another print of this same image is owned by singer Sir Elton John, who has amassed one of the world's greatest collections of photography. 

 

2/10Seated Figure by Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon, Seated Figure (1977). (Courtesy Tanya Baxter Contemporary)
Francis Bacon, Seated Figure (1977). (Courtesy Tanya Baxter Contemporary)

Francis Bacon is widely regarded as one of the most important artists of the 20th century, famous for his raw—and sometimes grotesque—paintings of the human form. He has also been back in the spotlight this year thanks to two major exhibitions: All Too Human: Bacon, Freud And A Century Of Painting Life at Tate Britain and Bacon—Giacometti at Fondation Beyeler. This etching is being exhibited at Fine Art Asia by Tanya Baxter Contemporary

See also: 10 Hong Kong Art Exhibitions To See In September

3/10Qing dynasty copper dish 

Copper dish decorated with polychrome enamels from the Qing dynasty, Qianlong period (1736 – 1795). (Courtesy Jorge Welsh Works of Art)
Copper dish decorated with polychrome enamels from the Qing dynasty, Qianlong period (1736 – 1795). (Courtesy Jorge Welsh Works of Art)

This striking copper dish decorated with the image of a snarling dragon is sure to be in-demand among antiques collectors. It dates back to the Qing dynasty, a period when the Emperor's court embraced culture and became a leading patron of the arts. Visit the booth of Jorge Welsh Works of Art at Fine Art Asia to see it in person. 

4/10The Weight of Oneself by Liu Di

Liu Di, The Weight of Oneself (2017). (Courtesy of Pékin Fine Arts)
Liu Di, The Weight of Oneself (2017). (Courtesy of Pékin Fine Arts)

While some galleries at Fine Art Asia showcase ancient antiques, others are exhibiting art that's made using the latest technology. Pékin Fine Arts, which has galleries in Hong Kong and Beijing, is screening Chinese artist Liu Di's 3D video animation The Weight of Oneself, which explores the conflict between people and nature. 

See also: Wong Ping Stirs Controversy With His Explicit Videos

5/10Femme Nue Assise by Pierre-Auguste Renoir 

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Femme Nue Assise (Seated Nude) (c. 1900). (Courtesy Haynes Fine Art)
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Femme Nue Assise (Seated Nude) (c. 1900). (Courtesy Haynes Fine Art)

Pierre-Auguste Renoir was one of the leaders of the 19th-century Impressionist movement and his works are now collected by major museums including New York's Museum of Modern Art, London's Tate and the Louvre in Paris. This small oil-on-canvas painting is being brough to Fine Art Asia by Haynes Fine Art.

6/10Thangka of Vairocana by the Drigung Kagyu School of Nepal 

Thangka of Vairocana by the Drigung Kagyu School of Nepal dating back to the 14th century. (Courtesy Carlton Rochell Asian Art)
Thangka of Vairocana by the Drigung Kagyu School of Nepal dating back to the 14th century. (Courtesy Carlton Rochell Asian Art)

Thangkas are traditional Buddhist paintings on cotton or silk that were historically used to help with meditation. Now, ancient thangkas are in demand with art collectors—including Chinese billionaire Liu Yiqian, who spent US$45 million on a 600-year-old Tibetan thangka at a Christie's auction in 2014. This 14th century Tibetan thangka is being brought to Fine Art Asia by Carlton Rochell Asian Art from New York. 

See also: 50 Biggest Art Collectors In Asia

7/10Love Me Love Me by Walasse Ting 

Walasse Ting, Love Me Love Me 10040 (1993). (Courtesy Alisan Fine Arts)
Walasse Ting, Love Me Love Me 10040 (1993). (Courtesy Alisan Fine Arts)

The colourful paintings of Chinese-American artist Walasse Ting can be found on the walls of the Pompidou Centre in Paris, Tate Modern in London, the Guggenheim in New York and—if you take this painting home from Alisan Fine Arts' booth at Ink Asia—your house, too. Alisan Fine Arts is managed by Daphne King-Yao, who's on Tatler's 500 List. 

See also: Women Of Hope: Daphne King-Yao Of Alisan Fine Arts

8/10Fish and Stone by Gao Qian

Gao Qian, Fish and Stone (2016). (Courtesy of Ami Li Gallery)
Gao Qian, Fish and Stone (2016). (Courtesy of Ami Li Gallery)

Amy Li Gallery from Beijing is exhibiting this two-metre-tall ink painting by Gao Qian at Ink Asia. Gao, who is currently working as director of the education department at Shanghai Art Museum, is one of a new generation of Mainland Chinese artists bringing ink painting into the 21st century. 

9/10Zen (5) by Lui Shou-kwan

Lui Shou-kwan, Zen (5) (1970). (Courtesy The Ink Society)
Lui Shou-kwan, Zen (5) (1970). (Courtesy The Ink Society)

Lui Shou-kwan is widely credited with starting the New Ink Movement in Hong Kong in the 1950s and '60s, a movement that combined traditional Chinese painting techniques with Western theories of abstraction, so it's fitting that his works are being shown at Ink Asia by the non-profit organisation The Ink Society. This painting, titled Zen (5), is one of Lui's many paintings that explore the Buddhist teachings of zen. 

10/10The Twenty Four Solar Terms: Summer Commences by Cao Xiaoyong

Cao Xiaoyong, The Twenty Four Solar Terms: Summer Commences (2017). (Courtesy Hanart TZ Gallery and the artist)
Cao Xiaoyong, The Twenty Four Solar Terms: Summer Commences (2017). (Courtesy Hanart TZ Gallery and the artist)

Hanart TZ Gallery, which was established by Johnson Chang in Hong Kong in 1983, is hosting an exhibition of new charcoal-on-paper drawings by Cao Xiaoyang at Ink Asia. The show features Cao's latest work: a monumental scroll drawing that is 2.5 metres tall. 

See also: 5 Contemporary Chinese Artists Inspired By Robert Rauschenberg

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ArtsArtArt FairFine Art AsiaInk Asia

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