This Is Why Fad Diets Don't Work

Wellness

March 24, 2017 | BY Mia Rigden

How to stop dieting and start living

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Photo: Courtesy of RASA

Atkins, South Beach, The Zone, alkaline diets—there are so many weight-loss programs out there it’s hard to keep them all straight.

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Everyone loves the promise of a hot body by summer, so it’s only natural to jump on the bandwagon when a new “miracle” diet comes on the market. But just like Brangelina, love affairs with new diets don't last—and here's why:

We’re all different.

We each have distinct DNA, upbringings and daily routines. Nutrition is not one-size-fits-all. So, how can these “fad diets” claim to work for everyone? They don’t. That’s why there are so many of them.

Eating habits are psychological.

You might lose weight on a diet, but keeping it off is another story. Instead of demonising food groups, think about adding in healthier foods, new workouts and mindfulness routines to create sustainable new lifestyle habits you can continue after your “diet” is over.

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Healthy recipes (Photo: Courtesy of RASA)

Don't sacrifice your happiness.

There are healthy and unhealthy ways to lose weight. Don’t compromise your health—or your sanity—to shed a few pounds. Measure success based on how you feel, not what the scale says. Don’t be so hard on yourself and give your body some love—it will love you back. 

There are no quick fixes.

Are you supposed to be on this diet forever? If you have perfectly portioned meals delivered to you for five days, what do you eat on day six? What about when you go out to dinner or on holiday in France (gasp!)? Think long term—it’s all about making lifestyle changes that you can stick with and don’t feel like a chore.

Your goals have to be realistic.

Incremental changes over a longer period of time will give you smaller, more realistic milestones to celebrate as well as motivate you to keep going. Try to focus on the steps you need to take to get there, rather than obsessing over the results. 

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(Photo: Courtesy of RASA)

If you’re interested in cleaning up your diet and developing healthy new habits, check out the RASA Challenge—a 21-day mind and body reset created to change your relationship with food.


Mia is a licensed Holistic Health Coach from the Institute of Integrated Nutrition, and holds diplomas in Classic Culinary Arts from The French Culinary Institute, and English Literature from UC Santa Barbara.

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