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Arts Hong Kong Antiquities Authority Announces Three Newly Declared Monuments

Hong Kong Antiquities Authority Announces Three Newly Declared Monuments

Hong Kong Antiquities Authority Announces Three Newly Declared Monuments
Three historic sites in Hong Kong have been added to Antiquities Authority's list of declared monuments (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
By Helen Yu
By Helen Yu
July 20, 2021
Three more historic buildings in Hong Kong are added to the Antiquities Authority’s list of declared monuments, making a total of 129 protected sites in the city

Hong Kong’s Antiquities Authority has recently declared three historic buildings—Bonham Road Government Primary School in Sai Ying Pun, the Old Tai Po Police Station in Tai Po, as well as Hip Tin Temple in Sha Tau Kok as monuments. Under the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance, the newly declared sites will be given the highest level of legal protection and preserved to promote Hong Kong’s history. With the three buildings adding to the list, the city now has a total of 129 declared monuments.  

See also: 10 Unexpectedly Revitalised Historic Sites in Hong Kong: Now and Then

The bird's eye view of the main building of Bonham Road Government Primary School, showing its E-shaped plan comprising a long centre portion and a wing on each end (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The central staircase and a curved façade of the main building of Bonham Road Government Primary School  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The central spiral staircase with terrazzo finishes of the main building of Bonham Road Government Primary School  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The timber doors, steel-framed windows with patterned or plain glass panes, and the old-styled ironmongery of the main building of Bonham Road Government Primary School, which are all well maintained  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The front elevation and verandahs of the Main Building of the Old Tai Po Police Station  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The Staff Quarters Block of the Old Tai Po Police Station  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The Canteen Block of the Old Tai Po Police Station  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The Charge Room with cells and armoury of the Old Tai Po Police Station  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The façade of the main building of Hip Tin Temple  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The Chinese characters of "Hip Tin Temple" inscribed on the stone plaque above the entrance of the temple. The characters were written in 1894 by Liang Zhirong, who obtained the degree of "jinshi" in the 16th year of the Guangxu reign (1890)  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The altar in the middle bay of the rear hall of Hip Tin Temple with a three-layer surround in polychrome colour, which is intricately carved with floral and animal motifs, as well as auspicious objects  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
The original lantern beam inscribed with the year of rebuilding Hip Tin Temple, i.e. the 20th year of the Guangxu reign (1894)  (Photo: Courtesy of Hong Kong Antiquities Authority)
 

The Boham Road Government Primary School was built in the early 1940s to house the Northcote Training College, which is known as Hong Kong’s first full-time teacher training college that was established in 1939. During the Japanese occupation period, the college was used as the headquarters of the Japanese Military Police. As stated in the announcement, the main building has been serving educational purposes since it was built in 1941, and is valued as “a rare example of a school premise being used for primary and tertiary education.”

The second newly declared monument, the Old Tai Po Police Station, is known as the oldest surviving police station in the New Territories. Built in 1899, the station was the first station and headquarters in the New Territories, which has borne witness to the establishment of British colonial rule in the area. This landmark is composed of three single-storey utilitarian buildings, namely the Main Building, the Staff Quarters Block and the Canteen Block. According to the government, most of the original architectural features, such as Dutch gables, fireplaces and the flagpole at the front yard, still remain in very good condition despite internal refurbishment and alterations made for operational requirements over the past 120 years.

Lastly, Hip Tin Temple in Sha Tau Kok was rebuilt between 1894 and 1895 to replace an ancient, Ming dynasty-era temple dedicated to the Chinese deity Kwan Tai. The building has a significant historical value as it witnessed the economic development of the Sha Tau Kok area in the late 19th century. It’s also valued as one of the few surviving temples associated with the Tung Wo Market operated by the village alliance Shap Yeuk, which dominated the economy of the Sha Tau Kok area from the 1830s to the 1930s. In terms of architectural details, the exquisitely crafted altar and fascia boards, the trefoil doorways of the front and rear halls, as well as the fine brick façade with a granite door frame and plaster dragonfish corbels, all remain intact.

Discover more about Hong Kong’s declared monuments at the official websites of the Development Bureau and Antiquities and Monuments Office

See also: 8 Beautiful Temples To Visit In Hong Kong 

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Arts hong kong historic buildings Antiquities Authority history cultural heritage culture declared monuments buildings

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