Best Hong Kong Tailors: Where to Find Tuxedos, Wedding Suits and Shirts for the Groom

Weddings

August 2, 2011 | BY MEIMEI SONG

For a perfect tuxedo or a suit good enough for your wedding day, we look around Hong Kong in search of the best wedding suits for the groom

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Hong Kong is famously known for having one of the best selections of quality tailors to make a suit, with the added perk of a reasonable price tag. And thanks to this reputation and demand, finding a tailored suit for men in Hong Kong is a piece of cake.

However, there are occasions in where ‘just’ a tailored suit isn’t good enough – ask any fashion-conscious man and they will tell you – it’s the quality, cut and detailing that makes a properly fitted suit a cut above the rest. A prime example lies in a wedding; while a lot of attention is given to the dressmaker behind the bride’s gown – Christian Dior, Vera Wang, Monique L’Huillier, Oscar de la Renta to name just a few – we believe, the groom should seek a wedding suit or a tuxedo of equal craftsmanship, after all it is the most important day of your life, and you’ll have plenty of photos to remember the day, and the suit you wore.

To help our grooms out in finding the perfect wedding suits available, we scout out the crème de la crème of fine-tailoring in Hong Kong.




W.W. Chan & Sons Tailor

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For decades the world of tailoring has been separated into different schools of tailoring, among them are the Shanghai-trained tailors, who are considered the cream of the crop in the industry. As a result, Shanghainese tailors are heavily sought-after and many tailors make claims to be a member of this fraternity. W.W Chan is a tailor who is from the Red Gang, an elite group of Shanghai-trained tailors. And the quality of the craftsmanship speaks for itself – its bespoke suits fit like a glove. The structure, cut, frame, and craftsmanship whether it be a waist coat, jacket, tuxedo, trousers or overcoat is precise to a tee, of Savile Row quality. That said, special mention should go to their buttonholes and their quality Italian fabric selection. Having been in the industry for 63 years, its service, know-how and attention to detail has rightfully given it its reputation as one of the best tailors in Hong Kong to date.

The Armoury, 307 Pedder Building, 12 Pedder Street, Central; Tel: +852 2804 6991; or 2/F Burlington House, 94 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui; Tel: +852 2366 9738
 


 

Ascot Chang

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One of the few Hong Kong-grown brands that has made an international name for itself, Ascot Chang is best known for its expertise in shirt-making, and thus, we shall recommend no other than Ascot Chang to create your wedding shirt, or shirts. To order from Hong Kong, the process takes about one to two weeks (an additional two to three weeks for international orders), but it’s well-worth the wait as its know-how allows for an ideal fit, taking into account body movement and posture. Moreover, to choose the right shirt for your big day, the in-house tailor will accompany you through the process as you select from over 3500 fabrics, 20 collar and cuff varieties, 10 collar lining options and fabrics of premium quality – need we say more?

Shop 130, Prince's Building, Central; +852 852-2523 3663


 

Tai Pan Row

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With over 38 years of experience and with a flexible and easygoing team of professional tailors, this IFC-located store utilises high-quality fabrics from luxury brands such as Brioni, Ermenegildo Zegna, Loro Piana, Cerruti 1881 just to name a few, to create its made-to-measure suits. Generally, the tailoring experience is a uniform, no-fuss and quick process; and with their thorough understanding of the men’s suit, getting a high-quality suit here is a safe bet as they can do no wrong. For those who don’t have time as a luxury, its user-friendly online service is a great alternative.

Shop 3015, IFC Mall, Central; Tel: +852 2147 2828


 

Raja Fashions

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At the helm of the family-run Raja Fashions is Raja Daswani, whose work as a tailor is a cut above the rest. Like all the other premium tailors, his cuts instantly flatter. But what Raja has that no other tailor has in Hong Kong, is a treasure trove of 20,000 fabrics to choose from, including materials from Ermenegildo Zegna, Dormeuil, Scabal and Holland & Sherry. Moreover, as he gained international fame by word of mouth from his clients, he began travelling abroad to deliver his service literally at your door. Today, few times a year Daswani does a world tour to offer his thrifty hands abroad.

Unit M, 13/F Kaiser Estate Phase 3, 11 Hok Yuen Street, Hung Hom; Tel: +852 2108 7000


 

A Man Hing Cheong

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For a suit similar to the quality commonly found in Savile Row, A Man Hing Cheong is your go-to tailor. The Mandarin Oriental-located tailor stocks Italian fabrics but its material is predominantly English (featuring brands such as Edwin Woodhouse and Charles Clayton), as is its expertise in suit styles. Popular amongst connoisseurs, a suit requires a minimum three fittings. Getting a custom suit isn’t gentle on the wallet but if you know what you want and you need a guarantee of quality, this is a fail-safe nook.

Mezzanine, Mandarin Oriental Hotel, 5 Connaught Road, Central; +852 2522 3336


 

In addition to the ones chosen above, co-owners of artisan haberdashers The Armoury Alan See and Mark Cho also recommend tailors such as Baromon, William Yu and Gordon Yao in Hong Kong, recognising these tailors as skill-driven, solid and unpretentious artisans.

Before you set foot into any of the shops mentioned above, however, you should have a rough idea of the suit you have in mind. If tailoring lingo such as flannel, Harris tweed and sleeve pitch mean little to you, it is best you bring images of suits you like as references when meeting the tailor.

If you really haven’t a clue where to begin, our advice is leave it to the tailor. See suggests you stick to the “house” cut, since in most of these cases, the tailor (and not the customer) is always right.