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FashionSarah Fung: How To Shop Sustainably

Sarah Fung: How To Shop Sustainably

Sarah Fung: How To Shop Sustainably
By Hong Kong Tatler
August 17, 2018
Founder of Hula, an online platform for pre-owned designer womenswear and accessories shares tips on how we can reduce the distress we cause Mother Nature

One of a kind 

Embrace pre-owned. Every pre-owned garment is one less new item bought. Buying pre-owned reduces waste, extends the life of your wardrobe and gets you more for your buck, especially when buying quality, luxury pre-owned items.

Also, purchasing vintage means you often get to wear something no one else has. That’s the best feeling!

Photo: Unsplash
Photo: Unsplash

Know your brands

Study green brands. Supporting labels that are consciously trying to reduce environmental waste is a key step to changing the way we shop.

Look for designers creating clothes with offcuts or fabrics that are less harmful to the planet.

See also: Ethically Chic: Designer Ji Won Choi Gets Deep About Sustainable Fashion

Photo: Courtesy of Nic and Bex Gaunt
Photo: Courtesy of Nic and Bex Gaunt

Devil's in the details

Beware of the finishes. Fabrics that are dyed—for example, with indigo for jeans or heavy metal dyes for leather—can cause toxic waste that ends up in rivers and oceans.  

Learn about the people making your clothes and buy accordingly. Brands with ethical production methods—such as paying workers fair wages, working with non-toxic materials, reducing packaging—should be on your radar.    

Photo: Unsplash
Photo: Unsplash

Price check

Be wary of anything that seems too cheap; someone (the garment maker probably) is paying for it down the line.

Avoid acrylic, polyester, PVC. Also fur (real and faux, as most fake fur comes from plastic) and denim. If you must, buy them second-hand.

See also: The Best Faux Fur Fashion Brands You Need To Know

Photo: Unsplash
Photo: Unsplash

Quality over quantity

Gauge how many times you’re likely to wear something. If you wear a $2,000 cashmere sweater 100 times versus a $200 polyester one four times, their cost per wear is $20 and $50 respectively, so the cashmere is effectively cheaper than the polyester one.

Plus, you’ll be likely to wear quality pieces for longer.

See also: 11 Eco-Essentials For A Plastic-Free Life

Tags

FashionSustainable FashionFashionSecond HandLuxuryShoppingHulaSarah Fung

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